Tag psych central magazine

Tag psych central magazine

What Did Your Parents Teach You?

Tags: , , , , , , , adult child, healing, Parenting
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What teachings did your parents offer you in your childhood and teen years? Be mindful as you answer that question of the spoken and unspoken teachings and messages that were given to you and what you received.

Let us first consider the spoken teachings from your parents or primary caregivers. The elements necessary to parent a child well are multi-faceted and require consistent love and effort on the parents’ part. The parents’ attitude and energy level also must be considered. The parents’ history and background are factors in how well or effectively they teach by word and example. Continue Reading…

Hear This Loud and Clear!

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , Live Inspired!®, Mom's Choice Award-Winner, Nina Sidell, Parenting for Life book, Uncategorized
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When you were growing up did you ever ask or hear the question, “If you could do without one of your senses, which one would it be?” It is a complex and disturbing query. As a human being you rely heavily on your senses (along with your intellect and emotions) to navigate this thing called Life. Our senses have been called, intelligences, minds, perceptions, sensations, sense organs, sensory skills or deficits, sentient feelings, and physical sensations.

Like many people who enjoy the vast musical offerings during the summer months, I too, love outdoor concerts in abundance. There is something special about feeling the warmth of a summer’s day or sultry summer evening while listening to wonderful live music. While traveling across three states with a friend to attend a music festival recently, I was reminded of just how important our senses are. We often take for granted that which our bodies can do without effort or question. Continue Reading…

Hushed Tones Speak Loudly

Tags: , , , , , , , , , Live Inspired!®, Uncategorized
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World of Psychology

When we communicate with other people we have the choice to speak, listen, respond, or be silent. We choose to talk in loud, moderate, or hushed tones. Depending on the content and context of our dialogues and how we feel about the person or subject, we share with some degree of forcefulness or gentleness.

While speaking in loud tones produces immediate attention, speaking in hushed tones does not minimize. In fact, often it maximizes the attention given to the speaker or the topic at hand. It is a powerful tool to quiet one’s voice when revealing something serious or important. Speaking quietly works well when sharing something private or personal, when teaching a child self-control and listening skills, and when making a strong point without fanfare or volume.

Delving into conversations, nuances flow between the words and tones Continue Reading…

Collective Compassion: Celebrating Our Humanity

Tags: , , , , , , , , catalyst, Celebrate our humanity, Collective Compassion, Live Inspired!®, psych central, restore faith in humanity
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As human beings we are inscribed with natural tendencies to connect with one another, disregarding natural differences that separate us. Despite the vast ways in which people find division and disconnection from one another, there are some glowing attributes that illuminate the human condition.

When we think of the world today and all of its “sham, drudgery and broken dreams” as Max Ehrmann wrote in his 1927 poem Desiderata, we may become disillusioned or feel sad that there is a lack of real or widespread compassion among us. However, as Ehrmann so eloquently went on to explain long ago, “It is still a beautiful world. Be cheerful. Strive to be happy.”

What makes our world beautiful in today’s modern times? What can we grasp onto Continue Reading…

Divorce and the Practice of Dating

Tags: , , , , , , , , Relationships
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World of Psychology

Growing up, many of us learned to value and naturally imagine our futures. We fantasized about who we would become when we grew up. That included who our future mates may be and what they’d look like, and our role in caring for our imaginary children. Others fantasized about a life partner or a career while children and a family were not on the agenda. For some people, singlehood without parenthood was the path. Either way, we all hoped that when we married, our unions would be happy and perhaps lifelong ones.

Most of us, when we bond or pair with another, especially when exclusive and monogamous, want it to work. However, studies described by the American Psychological Association show that “marriage and divorce are both common experiences. In Western cultures, more than 90 percent of people marry by age 50. Healthy marriages are good for couples’ mental and physical health. They are also good for children; growing up in a happy home protects children from mental, physical, educational and social problems. However, about 40 to 50 percent of married couples in the United States divorce. The divorce rate for subsequent marriages is even higher.”

Childhood books, movies, and cartoons promise a certain “happily ever after.” Well-meaning parents and caregivers promise a happy and idyllic future. A stark contrast exists today. But we are adjusting to new rules in today’s world. The options for “happily ever after” have widened. Divorce is more common; therefore, more people are divorced and dating. Continue Reading…